A wolf in lamb’s clothing?

food chains

A blog on the Centre for Sustainable Energy Use in Food Chains (CSEF) site looks at the lifecycle of meat products and the energy used in producing them.  The blog is based on the work of a project entitled ‘A review of the energy consumption in the UK fresh meat […]

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Next dimension of building energy modelling?

energy modelling

UCL’s Steve Evans and Dr Rob Liddiard on a new kind of 3D modelling that is giving a deeper understanding of energy use in buildings and premises.   Imagine having an explorable 3D map of all the shops and offices in a town or city. For researchers and policymakers trying […]

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The future of office work

future of office work

A new DEMAND Centre Research Insight looks into the future of office work and the potential benefits and pitfalls of mobile and flexible working. We hear a lot about flexible, agile and mobile working as ways of making more efficient use of office space and offering workers greater freedom in […]

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How welfare and employment policy impacts energy demand

welfare and energy

Catherine Butler of the University of Exeter looks at the links between the issues of welfare and energy demand for government policies in ‘non-energy’ areas The majority of the world’s governments are committed to taking action to reduce global warming following the COP21 agreement in 2016. Mitigating climate change is […]

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Nordic energy transitions

energy transitions

Read about a new study from the Centre on Innovation and Energy Demand’s Benjamin K Sovacool on Nordic low-carbon energy transitions. The paper ‘Contestation, contingency, and justice in the Nordic low-carbon energy transition’ looks at how five countries – Denmark, Finland, Iceland, Norway and Sweden – are on course to […]

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A history of UK energy policy

A blog from Dr David Vincent on the CIED Centre website discusses the evolution of UK energy policy since 1945 and the changing factors influencing it. The blog is entitled ‘The historical foundations of UK energy policy since the 1940s‘. It was inspired by a Centre on Innovation and Energy […]

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What is exergy economics?

How a new approach may offer insights into decoupling energy use from economic output. Blog post from Paul Brockway of the University of Leeds.   Since 1971, each 1% increase in global GDP per capita has been associated with a 0.7% increase in per capita primary energy consumption. This conflicts […]

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Early Career Leaders in Sustainable Development

sustainable development

Read the CIE-MAP Centre’s Dr Kate Scott’s blog on the Science for Sustainable Development Early-Career Leaders day on 2nd December in London. Dr Kate Scott, Research Fellow in the Sustainability Research Institute and inaugural Priestley Centre Piers Seller prize winner, attended the event, organised by the Network of Early-Career Sustainable […]

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Product lifetimes summit in Nottingham

product lifetimes

CIE-MAP Nottingham team lead international Product Lifetimes and the Environment (PLATE) event bringing together experts on repair, reuse and longevity of products. Product lifetimes An international group of academic, industry and NGO colleagues gathered at Nottingham Trent University on 6th December for the Product Lifetimes and the Environment (PLATE) Seminar.  […]

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Why social science is crucial in tackling climate change

Gas rings

EUED Centres Coordinator James O’Toole looks at the crucial importance of using social science approaches alongside technology in addressing greenhouse gas emissions. Scientist stereotypes? In the public consciousness, climate change science tends to focus on natural scientists (chemists, physicists, biologists etc.). Whether they are developing more energy efficient technologies, mapping […]

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Whose emissions are they anyway?

Photo credit: By Wmeinhart [GFDL (http://www.gnu.org/copyleft/fdl.html) or CC BY-SA 3.0 (http://creativecommons.org/licenses/by-sa/3.0)], via Wikimedia Commons

Dr Marco Sakai, Dr Kate Scott and Prof John Barrett of the CIE-MAP Centre argue that measuring carbon emissions by consumption rather than production would more accurately and fairly allocate responsibility for meeting climate change targets.   Measuring emissions As the COP22 UN Climate Change conference drew to a close […]

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Fuel poverty is not only about heating

fuel poverty

As central heating systems fire up around the country, the DEMAND Centre’s Gordon Walker argues that other types of domestic energy use could be incorporated more consistently and effectively into fuel poverty policy. Defining fuel poverty What does it mean to be fuel poor? Most people’s understanding of fuel poverty […]

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Invisible Energy Policy in Higher Education

high energy magic building

Sarah Royston, Jan Selby and Elizabeth Shove of the DEMAND centre explain why we need a new perspective on energy demand in Higher Education.   Despite ambitious targets, the Higher Education sector is performing badly on energy demand and carbon emissions. Instead of the targeted 43% cut in emissions by […]

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CIE-MAP research informs government industrial strategy

beis logo

October 27th saw the CIEMAP Centre’s Prof John Barrett take a lead role in an event which brought together industry, trade associations, academics and policy stakeholders to feed into BEIS’s industrial strategy.   This event – held at the BEIS conference centre – aimed to highlight the necessity of building […]

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Changing channels – the case for reuse and repair

e-waste-pile

Dr Christine Cole of the CIE-MAP team at Nottingham Trent University explains why we need a rethink about when and how we dispose of electronic equipment.   With technology advancing so rapidly, many of us are hungry for the latest gadgets, entertainment systems and appliances, and soon lose interest in […]

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Putting Transport Poverty on the Map

transport poverty map

9% of UK households suffer from the transport equivalent of fuel poverty. New research from the Institute for Transport Studies – working with the DEMAND Centre – highlights the problem of transport affordability and transport poverty in the UK. The (t)ERES project examines how many households struggle with the cost […]

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How energy efficiency can boost incomes and the economy

energy transitions

A new blog from Strathclyde’s Centre for Energy Policy team digs beneath the obvious short-term effects of energy efficiency initiatives to explore knock-on economic and social benefits.  Following on from the Scottish First Minister’s announcement of £20m of energy efficiency funds as part of a general package to stimulate the […]

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Exploring the links between energy efficiency and health

Pilot light

The Centre for Energy Epidemiology contributes to government actions to improve health and prevent illness by understanding the direct and indirect effects of energy efficiency on health, writes James O’Toole, EUED Coordinator.   Using energy efficiency as a measure to improve health is increasing. Examples of measures so far carried […]

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Painted into a corner on Hinkley

David Elmes

New blog post on Hinkley Point nuclear power station plan from Professor David Elmes (i-STUTE Co-Investigator and Head of Warwick Business School Global Energy Research Network). This is what being painted into a corner feels like. After the surprise delay by Theresa May in the summer, the UK Government’s confirmation […]

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